Don't miss
  • 12
  • 6468
  • 6097
  • 20

Evony repents?

By on August 17, 2010
Print Friendly

After my post last week in which I declared war on Evony ads on GAMESbrief, something surprising happened.

Evony’s US-based PR firm, Triplepoint, got in touch and said that Evony were trying to clean up their act.

They’ve announced that they are going to make it easier for webmasters to get rid of non-family-friendly Evony ads (like the one shown), although they also say “we cannot say with certainty that we will no longer feature less family friendly ads aimed at a the appropriate audience.”

(I had to work hard to unscramble the triple negative in that sentence – I think their PR agency needs to work on clarity of copy.)

Evony has also established an “address consumers and publishers can use to submit complaints, issues or requests regarding their advertising: [email protected].”

Evony has even announced that it will try to make its ads reflect the gameplay, telling GamaSutra “we are employing an ad campaign that focuses on the gameplay and features of Evony: Age II.”

Evony has generated 19 million registered users in its first year on the basis of the existing, misleading campaign, which is impressive however you look at. Now they say that they are going to shift to a more-focused set of online ads.

Let’s hope that this initiative sticks.

About Nicholas Lovell

Nicholas is the founder of Gamesbrief, a blog dedicated to the business of games. It aims to be informative, authoritative and above all helpful to developers grappling with business strategy. He is the author of a growing list of books about making money in the games industry and other digital media, including How to Publish a Game and Design Rules for Free-to-Play Games, and Penguin-published title The Curve: thecurveonline.com
  • I’m actually kind of happy to see Evony’s success. It used to frustrate me back at GameShadow that a single curve of Lara’s left boob could prompt more clicks than the fantastic indie game right next to it, and while as a journalist I’d be loathe to use misrepresentative advertising just to generate clicks I don’t see why a bunch of idiots clicking on a girl in her pants shouldn’t be turned into a few more idiots playing an online game.

    Maybe someone, somewhere might learn a lesson.