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Help please – the blurb for my book

By on February 9, 2011

I am planning on a publishing experiment. I am about to release the edited highlights of the first two years of GAMESbrief in book form.

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It will be available for free as a pdf, for a low fee on Kindle and at the price of a good business paperback on Amazon. I hope to have some limited edition/higher value elements too, but I’m still ironing the details out.

Here is the blurb for the back of the book. Would it make you buy the book? Does it capture the essence of why you read GAMESbrief? Is it dull and worthy or exciting and stimulating.

Any comments would be gratefully received.

From the author of GAMESbrief come the burning questions facing an industry in turmoil. The games business (and the wider entertainment markets) are reeling from digital transition, rapid globalisation, economic downturn and the pressures of free content, both legitimate and illegitimate.

Nicholas Lovell, author of the acclaimed GAMESbrief blog, answers these questions in his trademark frank yet analytical style. Questions like:

  • Why video game tax credits are short game for long-term pain
  • Why the mass market will never be gamers
  • Is Constantin Film the stupidest company in the entire world?
  • Who are the ten games businesses that are doomed to failure

For biting analysis on copyright, politics and taxation for the games and entertainment industries, you need to read this book.

About Nicholas Lovell

Nicholas is the founder of Gamesbrief, a blog dedicated to the business of games. It aims to be informative, authoritative and above all helpful to developers grappling with business strategy. He is the author of a growing list of books about making money in the games industry and other digital media, including How to Publish a Game and Design Rules for Free-to-Play Games, and Penguin-published title The Curve: thecurveonline.com
  • Anonymous

    Looks like a good book, but the language in the copy is quite businessy and maybe a bit wordy. It might be better to talk about app stores and piracy, rather than digital transition and illegitimate free content, for example.

  • http://www.theaveragegamer.com Weefz

    I agree with seanmcmanus. I’m not a frequent visitor here but I do enjoy gamesbrief articles now and then. This blurb makes your content look far less approachable than it really is.

    This sentence in particular: “The games business (and the wider entertainment markets) are reeling from digital transition, rapid globalisation, economic downturn and the pressures of free content, both legitimate and illegitimate.”
    Too long, too much business jargon. Maybe try rule of 3?

  • Dom

    For me, it’s all back to front. Your end paragraph should lead and maybe (maybe) expand to include some of the first paragraph. Then come the questions, then support it with your credentials. I’d also ask whether your audience have heard of Gamesbrief. If they have then you go on to ask why they’d be buying a collection of your articles. If they’ve heard of you then chances are they have already read them.

    That thinking would lead me to write the copy on the premise that it is something else a reader is looking for in your book (hence my re-jigging).

    So maybe something like (and this is hasty):

    Read this book for a biting analysis on the games industry’s most burning issues as it gets knocked from pillar to post by the pressures of digital transition, rapid globalisation and the pressures of free content.

    Which ten games companies are doomed to failure?
    Why are video game tax credits short game for long-term pain?
    Why will gaming never be mass market?
    Is Constantin Film the most stupid company in the entire world?

    All these questions and many more are discussed with brutal frankness by Nicholas Lovell, author of the acclaimed GAMESbrief blog – the scourge of video game developers and publishers alike.

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  • A G Aitcheson

    This is a very good start, and I do agree with the above posts so far. My main suggestion is that I don’t like the questions and think they would be better as statements. It sounds more forceful and radical that way. Perhaps:

    “Inside, you will find out:

    Which ten games companies are doomed to failure
    How video game tax credits are short game for long-term pain
    Why will gaming never be mass market
    Why Constantin Film is the most stupid company in the entire world”

    I also don’t like the Constantin Film line because I don’t know why they actually are, and it just sounds like childish namecalling. Perhaps there’s a more businesslike way to point to the issue that article tackles.

    I hope this helps :)

  • A G Aitcheson

    edit: I meant to write “Why gaming will never be mass market”

  • Anonymous

    I think it’s a bit stiff. How about something softer like…

    The games business is dealing with the transition to digital distribution, globalisation and the economic downturn.

    Nicholas Lovell, creator of the acclaimed GAMESbrief blog, has been writing and consulting on these topics and more for years. In this book he gathers together some of his signature articles on topics of games and business, presented in an easily-digestible format.

    Covering topics such as:

    * Video games and tax credits
    * Why the mass market will never be gamers
    * Which companies do and don’t understand the digital age?
    * Business model and games

    Lovell provides thoughtful yet sharp analysis on the issues facing the games business both now and into the future. If you are involved in the production, financing or development of games then you need to read this book.

  • Dom

    My copy was really only for structure. What I would do would be decide how I want to come across. Do you want to be seen as tough, hard hitting, aggressive, controversial even and present the issues in terms of real dilemmas. The softer stuff (no disrespect intended) is a little drier and whilst it may interest the “professional” it won’t pull in the wider audiences who might be drawn by the smell of scandal and unrest. I’d look at the questions too, some very good points made here but what it shows me is that there is a need to find the very best questions that might attract readers. It really isn’t just about rewriting the original copy. It’s about identifying who you want your audience to be and then writing to them.

    This is fascinating stuff :)

  • http://www.gamesbrief.com Nicholas Lovell

    thanks, Sean. I write about the business of games, but that’s no reason to be too businessy in the description (In fact, I try very hard to make what I do easy to understand)

  • http://www.gamesbrief.com Nicholas Lovell

    Rule of 3. Never a mistake

  • http://www.gamesbrief.com Nicholas Lovell

    It’s a good point about Constantin. Turning questiions into statements is more controversial :-)

    I lke it though, and thanks for helping.

  • http://www.gamesbrief.com Nicholas Lovell

    One challenge is that I am covering only 1/3 of the topics on GAMESbrief in this book. I have volumes on “traditional games and the transition to digital” and “social, mobile and the power of free”.
    So I have to keep my powder dry for some of them.