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Crowdfunding a video series by lawyers for indie devs

By on November 21, 2012

Most of us  just want to follow our passion, create new things and make money. So that’s what most resources for indie developers focus on. As was pointed out in a recent guest post, many indie developers don’t want to worry about the finer details of running a business. So when legal issues come up, it can be overwhelming and confusing just figuring out where to go for information, let alone how to approach a problem.

California-based nonprofit New Media Rights has just launched an indiegogo campaign aimed at helping game developers to be prepared and educated about legal issues that could affect their business. They are creating a video series of interviews with creators and journalists, to share lessons learned and help independent businesses to be more savvy. Here at Gamesbrief we love featuring legal and practical information on running a business, so we’re really excited to see a video series like this being made.

New Media Rights Assistant Director, Shaun Spalding, said “When we started LAGD, we thought it was strange that there was almost no well-organized video content about how to avoid legal and business problems in an industry where almost everyone starts out with lots of passion but little money for expert advice. And then we started contacting developers for interviews about how legal issues have actually affect them, and we were inspired by the passion and outpouring of support the community gave us.”

Their indiegogo campaign is raising money to fund another series of videos, so that they can keep sharing valuable information. Do check out this pilot video about hiring independent contractors, and then consider funding them.

About Zoya Street

I’m responsible for all written content on the site. As a freelance journalist and historian, I write widely on how game design and development have changed in the past, how they will change in the future, and how that relates to society and culture as a whole. I’m working on a crowdfunded book about the Dreamcast, in which I treat three of the game-worlds it hosted as historical places. I also write at Pocketgamer.biz and The Borderhouse.